ltaggart@asbmr.org

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  1. ltaggart@asbmr.org

    In-Memoriam: Geoffrey Hendy

    In-Memoriam: Geoffrey Hendy
  2. It is with sadness we share the news of the passing of Dr. Michael Kleerekoper after a long illness. Dr. Kleerekoper will be remembered as a prominent physician and scientist who was nationally recognized as an expert in the field of Bone and Mineral Metabolism. Dr. Kleerekoper obtained his undergraduate and medical training, as well as internship and residency, at the University of Sydney in Australia. He then came to the United States for fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at Washington University School of Medicine and The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis (now Barnes-Jewish). Upon completion of his fellowship, he joined the faculty at Henry Ford Hospital in 1976 and began his research focus in the area of Bone and Mineral Metabolism. While at Henry Ford, he served in various roles as Senior Staff Physician, Director of the Clinical Research Unit, Deputy Director of the Bone & Mineral Research Laboratory, Director of the Center for Osteoporosis Research and lastly, Division Head of the Bone & Mineral Division from 1985 until his departure in 1993, when he left to join as tenured faculty at Wayne State University. At Wayne State, he served as the Director of Research for the areas of Bone and Mineral Metabolism and Gerontology for the School of Medicine. He ultimately joined the faculty at The University of Toledo Medical School where he was Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Section Chief of the Endocrinology Division. Mike Kleerekoper was an outstanding investigator, superior physician and an inspiring instructor. He was extensively funded by the NIH, widely published, and was on the editorial board of journals dedicated to osteoporosis. In 2006, Dr. Kleerekoper was recognized with the distinguished honor of Master of The American College of Endocrinology (MACE). His passing represents a loss to the specialty of Endocrinology. Please join your colleagues in sharing your fond memories of Mike. ASBMR will share these messages with his family. Post your memory or condolences below, or consider making a donation in his memory.
  3. It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Webster S.S. Jee, one of the giants in our field on April 3, 2018. Dr. Jee was born in Oakland, California, where he grew up. He served in the US Army Air Corps during World War II and then earned his B.A. and M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. Web joined the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1951, where he began his bone research career as an Anatomist/Radiobiologist, eventually receiving his Ph.D. in 1959. Web was Director of the Radiobiology Bone Group/Laboratory and Professor of Anatomy at Utah for nearly fifty years. He not only conceived of, organized, and directed the Sun Valley Hard Tissue Workshop from 1970-2004, but also was instrumental in helping bone scientists in the People’s Republic of China organize their early bone research-related meetings. As the 2003 recipient of the ASBMR Gideon A. Rodan Excellence in Mentorship Esteemed Award, Dr. Jee was a pioneer in the field of pre-clinical bone biology and pharmacology. Web not only did numerous experiments that revealed fundamental principles about bone behavior in the adult skeleton, but also trained over 200 scientists from across the world in his newly developed techniques. His research topics included the earliest morphologic demonstration of dynamic bone remodeling in the adult skeleton; early investigation of the hematogenous origin of osteoclasts; and development/pre-clinical testing of the idea of rescuing low bone mass with an anabolic agent then preserving the new bone with an anti-resorptive agent, a concept that is now used clinically. Many of Dr. Jee’s trainees went on to do pre-clinical and clinical research that contributed to the development of today’s bone therapeutic agents. Web wrote over 800 papers, scientific articles, book chapters, abstracts, reviews, and editorials. The impact of his body of work on our current understanding of bone biology and development of bone therapeutic agents is immense. In addition to his contributions to the bone field, Dr. Jee will be remembered as an innovator, mentor, and man of great grace, humility, and good humor, who was forever devoted to creating opportunities for young scientists. Please join your colleagues in sharing your fond memories of Web. ASBMR will share these messages with his family. Post your memory or condolences below.
  4. It is with great sadness that ASBMR announces the passing of member Dr. Mary Ruppe, M.D. an exceptional physician, researcher, scholar, athlete, and mother, on March 14, 2018 in Houston, Texas. Dr. Ruppe became the endocrinology fellowship program director and director of the bone disease clinic at Houston Methodist Hospital in 2012 as a specialist in treating children and adults with genetic bone diseases. Dr. Ruppe was truly a special person, loved, respected and admired by family, friends, colleagues and patients whose outpouring of sympathy leave little doubt that she had a positive impact on the lives of all she touched. Contributions in memory of Dr. Mary Ruppe may be made to the Shriners Hospitals for Children, Attn: Office of Development, 2900 N. Rock Point Dr., Tampa, FL 33607 or via internet at https://donate.lovetotherescue.org. Join us in remembering Dr. Ruppe’s contributions to the field field by leaving a note or sharing a memory below.
  5. It is with great sadness that ASBMR announces the passing of Norman Howard Bell, M.D., professor emeritus at the Medical University of South Carolina and founding member of ASBMR, on Wednesday, December 6, 2017 at the age of 86. He will be remembered for his keen intellect, traditional values, and remarkable research success. Supported through continuous grants from the NIH, he and his colleagues made great strides in the fundamental understanding of Vitamin D deficiencies and the prevention of osteoporosis. In addition to his research, Dr. Bell mentored young people who are carrying on the research that he initiated. Join us in recognizing Dr. Bell’s contributions to our field by leaving a note, sharing a memory below, or contributing a donation in his honor.
  6. Our community has lost a excellent clinician who was appreciated by her patients and was also a meticulous researcher. Dr. Monique Arlot, M.D. passed away on November 2, 2017. Dr. Arlot was among the first collaborators of Professor Pierre Meunier in Lyon, France. There she participated in research on various bone diseases, including osteoporosis and Paget’s disease of bone. She was an expert in bone histomorphometry, particularly the assessment of dynamic remodeling indices using tetracycline labeling, and performed the bone biopsies in the Department of Rheumatology of the Edouard Herriot Hospital in Lyon. Monique has been a member of the ASBMR for many years. We are thinking of her family and friends, and we send them our deepest sympathy. To share a kind thought or memory of Dr. Arlot, please leave your thoughts below.
  7. ASBMR is saddened by the passing of a long-time member Jeffrey L. H. O’Riordan, Emeritus Professor of Metabolic Diseases at University College London. Dr. O’Riordan, a physician at the London’s Middlesex Hospital for over 30 years, established a world-class research program in PTH, vitamin D and mineral metabolism. His contributions to human disease were especially notable. He was an innovator in clinical assay development, which enabled definitive studies of the metabolic disturbances in patients with parathyroid disease and dysregulated vitamin D metabolism. His later work was instrumental in identification of PHEX gene mutations in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Dr. O’Riordan trained a host of clinical and basic researchers, many of whom are now international leaders in the field of bone and mineral research. One of his trainees commented “JLH was committed to human research and to educating his students in clinical medicine; he was “translational” before this word became popular”. Dr. O’Riordan was an enthusiastic and generous collaborator whose home in central London became a meeting place for scientists as they crossed the globe. To share a kind thought or memory of Dr. O’Riordan, please use the space below, or leave a donation in his memory.
  8. It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of ASBMR member Professor Judith Adams. Professor Adams had a long prolific academic and clinical career. Professor Adams most recently served as a Consultant Radiologist at Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and has been Clinical Director of the Radiology Department at Manchester Royal Infirmary and Chair of the regional committee for Clinical Excellence awards. She had a particular interest in osteoporosis, fracture recognition and the measurement of bone mineral density and her research has resulted in over 200 peer-reviewed publications, 24 invited reviews and 34 book chapters to date. She will be remembered as a great teacher and an exemplary colleague. She was dedicated and worked with passion to raise the radiologists' awareness and improve the healthcare of patients with osteoporosis. Professor Adams was so gracious and energetic that was only natural to have a positive impact to those that knew her. Join us in recognizing Professor Adams’ contribution to our field by leaving a note below, sharing a memory, or contributing a donation in her honor.
  9. It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of long-time member Adele Boskey, Ph.D., a senior scientist at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). Dr. Boskey was a pioneer in the bone mineralization field. Among her many discoveries and contributions to the field, Dr. Boskey was a pioneer in characterizing bone mineral changes in skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and rickets. She was the 2015 recipient of the ASBMR Lawrence G. Raisz Esteemed Award for outstanding achievements in preclinical translational research in the bone and mineral field. Her recent work suggests that measuring bone quality, rather than bone density, promises greater accuracy and could predict what characteristics of bone put patients at risk of fracture. A lifelong volunteer and mentor, Dr. Boskey served many years on various committees and boards in ASBMR, ORS, IADR, NOF, AAOS, and OIF. A recognized mentor of countless grad students, postdocs, and early career scientists, Dr. Boskey was known for generously giving her time and expertise to all who asked. In celebration of the life of Dr. Adele Boskey, please join colleagues at Hospital for Special Surgery for a memorial service honoring her on Wednesday May 17 at 6 -8 PM. The celebration will be held in the Richard L. Menschel Education Center located at Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, 2nd Floor. You can also join us in recognizing Dr. Boskey’s contribution to our field by leaving a note below, sharing a memory, or contributing a donation in her honor.
  10. It is with sadness that we announce the passing of Robert P. Heaney, M.D., one of the giants in our field. Dr. Heaney was born in Omaha and spent most of his life in his hometown and at his alma mater, Creighton University. He received his bachelor’s degree from Creighton University and his medical degree from Creighton’s School of Medicine in 1951. He became a faculty member at Creighton in 1957, and served as the university’s first vice president for health sciences. He was also the first to hold the John A. Creighton University Professorship. A recipient of the ASBMR Frederic C. Bartter Award in 1994, Dr. Heaney was a pioneering researcher whose decades of research elevated the national conversation about osteoporosis and the importance of calcium and vitamin D to bone health. Recognized by the National Osteoporosis Foundation as a “Legend of Osteoporosis,” Dr. Heaney worked with the Institute of Medicine to determine a recommended daily dose of calcium. Over the course of his professional career, he wrote 866 papers, scientific articles, reviews, editorials and other manuscripts, as well as three books. In addition to his many contributions to the field of bone science and nutrition, Dr. Heaney will be remembered as a healer, a thinker and a man of grace and generosity. Please join us in recognizing Dr. Heaney’s contributions to our field by leaving a note, sharing a memory or contributing a donation in his honor to the ASBMR Fund for Research and Education.
  11. We are sad to announce that ASBMR member Dr. Marion David Francis passed away on May 10, 2016, a day after his 93rd birthday. Dr. Francis was born in Vancouver, Canada and gained his BSc and MSc degrees in physics and chemistry at the University of British Columbia, followed by a PhD at the University of Iowa. In 1952, he joined the Procter and Gamble Company (P&G) in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA where he spent the rest of his professional career, publishing over 100 papers and 35 patents. He remained actively engaged in laboratory science until his retirement in 1993. He made major scientific discoveries in the dental and medical fields that have endured to the present day. His basic research on the chemistry of tooth enamel and dentine helped to lay the scientific foundation for the effective use of fluoride to prevent cavities. Fluoride-containing toothpastes continue to be used more than 50 years later. The extension of his work to controlling the formation of hydroxyapatite, with a view to preventing dental calculus and plaque, led to an interest in phosphonates as stable chemical analogues to influence these processes, as had previously been shown for pyrophosphate. This work led to the collaboration with Herbert Fleisch and Graham Russell that resulted in the first recognition of the important biological effects of the chemically stable bisphosphonates (then called diphosphonates) in the prevention of calcification and especially bone resorption. Dr. Francis played an important role in enabling the early clinical use of bisphosphonates, and derived great pleasure from their success. Dr. Francis’s third long-lasting contribution to medicine was to pioneer the development of radiolabeled bisphosphonates to detect abnormal metabolic bone activity. The use of 99mTc-labelled bisphosphonates was first commercialized at P&G and these imaging agents continue to be used today. His inventions improved the lives of millions of people around the world. For these significant achievements, Dr. Francis received several honors, including the Perkin Medal and "Hero of Chemistry" award from the American Chemical Society, and election to the prestigious Victor Mills Society at P&G. Please join us in recognizing Dr. Francis’s contribution to our field by leaving a note, sharing a memory, or contributing a donation in his honor.
  12. We are sad to announce that Professor Ignac Fogleman passed away on July 5th following a long and courageous fight against cancer. He received his medical degree at Glasgow University and took up the post of Consultant Physician at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital, London UK in 1983. He served as director of the Department of Nuclear Medicine between 1988-97 and became Director of the Osteoporosis Screening and Research Unit in 1988. During his time in Glasgow, under the supervision of Dr Iain Boyle, Ignac developed the technique of bone scanning using technetium-99m labelled diphosphonate compounds, which was widely used in the investigation of many metabolic bone disorders including osteomalacia, bone malignancy and Paget’s disease. In later years his research group at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals were leaders in the development of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography for the study of regional changes in bone remodeling in untreated and treated bone disease. He was closely involved with the National Osteoporosis Society for many years, serving as a Board Member between 1997 and 1998 and Chairman of its Densitometry Forum between 1999 and 2005. In addition to his many contributions to the bone field, Ignac will be remembered as a man of culture, wit and humanity. He will be greatly missed by his many friends and colleagues.
  13. It is with sadness that we announce the passing of ASBMR member Solomon Posen, M.D., FRACP. A longtime friend and colleague of many, Sol was a pioneer in bone and mineral endocrinology in Australia. His contributions in bone research ranged from basic biochemistry – he described the first means of distinguishing alkaline phosphatase of bone origin – to clinical studies in metabolic bone disease including work in Paget’s disease, osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism and tumour-induced osteomalacia. Many will remember him for his many questions and observations at various scientific meetings and the ANZBMS Sol Posen Research Award honours his commitment not only to bone and mineral research, but also to the education and mentoring of younger clinicians and scientists. Even after his retirement from the Department of Medicine at Sydney University (Australia) in 1990 and from clinical practice and teaching in 2000, he continued to engage in clinical and academic life from attendance at large international meetings to weekly attendance at North Shore Hospital grand rounds and journal clubs. A memorial service is planned at the Northern Sydney Medical School. Please join us in recognizing Dr. Posen’s contribution to our field by leaving a note, sharing a memory, or contributing a donation in his honor.
  14. We are saddened to announce the passing of ASBMR member Pierre J. Meunier, M.D. A pioneer of histomorphometry use in clinical studies, he was also widely noted for his influential work in the field of osteoporosis and rheumatic diseases, and for his renowned work as a mentor and editor in bone research. Dr. Meunier authored over 370 scientific manuscripts. He was Professor of Medicine at Claude Bernard Lyon University and Head of the Department of Rheumatology and Bone Diseases at the Edouard Herriot Hospital in Lyon, France. Professor Meunier was a thoughtful scientist who meticulously carried out his research and mentored many other colleagues. He leaves a legacy of scientific contributions to our field that will always be acknowledged as the field moves forward. Throughout his long career, Dr. Meunier’s research accomplishments were honored with numerous recognitions and awards. He was named a Decorated Officer of the Ordre des Palmes Academiques (France) and was a recipient of the ASBMR Frederic C. Bartter Award (1999), Paget Disease Foundation Prize (1991), IBMS John Haddad Award (1998), and the IOF Pierre Delmas International Prize (2010). He also served in numerous volunteer leadership positions with numerous bone organizations, including the editorial board of the JBMR, Editor-in-Chief of Bone (1978-1989), Editor-in-Chief of Osteoporosis International (1989-2005), Secretary of the European Calcified Tissue Society (1985-1991), and a consultant at the World Health Organization. Please join us in recognizing Dr. Meunier’s contribution to our field by leaving a note, sharing a memory, or contributing a donation in his honor