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Jessica  Baumgartner

ASBMR Mourns the Passing of Stephen Krane, M.D.

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ASBMR is saddened by the passing long-time member Stephen Krane, M.D. Dr. Krane was the fourth President of ASBMR, serving in the role from 1982 to 1983. He was a highly-regarded leader in the field and regular participant of the ASBMR Annual Meeting. Dr. Krane most recently served as the head of the Arthritis Unit at the Massachusetts General Hospital and as Persis, Cyrus and Marlow B Harrison Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. His career was devoted to the study of bone biology and rheumatic and metabolic bone diseases. His research included investigation of the effects of PTH and calcitonin, collagenase and its mechanisms, collagen synthesis and degradation in genetic and acquired diseases and inflammatory mechanisms in joint diseases. He was prolific, publishing more than 150 papers during his career. Dr. Krane’s colleague and friend Hank Kronenberg shared “He was a giant in the bone field: a major scientist and mentor to many. He was an impressive clinician, a scholarly curmudgeon and a special friend.” Click here to view Dr. Krane’s obituary.

 

To share a kind thought or memory of Dr. Krane, please comment below.

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Guest Robert Gagel

My favorite memory of Steve Krane that illustrated his clinical acumen occurred approximately 4-5 years ago at an Osteobiology dinner, held annually at the ASBMR meeting. I was speaking with Dr. Krane about his grant. He shared with me that he had decided not to renew his RO1 the previous summer. His reasoning was direct - he had decided that he would rather enjoy the summer at his Woods Hole, MA home than spend every waking moment working on his renewal. During our discussion (at the bar), he made the observation that he thought the bartender had ankylosing spondylitis. As I had not even noticed the bartender, I was surprised at his declaration. After engaging in some small talk with the bartender, he confirmed his diagnosis by asking the bartender whether he had a rheumatologic condition. The answer was a resounding "yes" - ankylosing spondylitis. Both the bartender and I were amazed. Steve made light of his observation - we were impressed.

 

My other memory is of the outstanding textbook he and Louis Avioli edited. It was my first introduction to metabolic bone disease and I cherish my first copy. A life well-lived. Bob Gagel

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Guest Steve Teitelbaum

Great scientist and funny guy. Had wonderful times with him and my mentor, Lou Avioli.

Steve Teitelbaum

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Guest Janet Hock

Steve was a very rare bird - a great, productive, and very knowledgeable scientist, and a very human and wonderful mentor through good times and bad. He was always completely honest and forthright in his opinions - incredibly valuable when discussing ideas, hypotheses and grant strategies. He was committed to his students, and held high expectations for them. The times I visited him, there were always students hanging around wanting a word, or enjoying Steve's conversation, or his "treats" - usually candy of some kind that he kept on tap in his office. Trips to his lab were always fun; there was so much to learn. I remember his wild enthusiasm when he finally figured out the cleavage site for collagenase. Steve told me that each summer, he would try to learn something completely new - a topic in science that had caught his fancy, a new research technology or an aspect of the arts - he was extremely well educated, and a great conversationalist. I admired him very much, and will miss him.

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Guest Dr. Adrian Crisp

It is with embarrassment that I am writing my tribute to Stephen Krane a year after his passing but I only learnt of this very recently from my UK friend and colleague Dr Jonathan Reeve. I was a research fellow of Stephen at Mass General from 1982-83. I had left the UK with extensive clinical experience but virtually no research experience in the lab. Stephen and his team welcomed me and my family most warmly and he was an exemplary scientific and social host throughout a most challenging but most enjoyable year. I have always expressed my opinion to many that Stephen was intellectually the brightest doctor whom I have ever encountered in my over 40 years in medicine but he was so much more than that: he was a polymath with cultural interests and deep knowledge in so many fields remote from medicine. He was warm and very funny and surrounded by a loving and close family. Within weeks of arrival in Boston my family and I were his guests at Thanksgiving. My career after Boston focused on clinical work and teaching in the UK rather than lab-based research which meant that I lost touch with Stephen -to my considerable loss and regret. He was a giant of a physician, scientist and human being.

 

Dr. Adrian Crisp

 

Cambridge

UK

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